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my youtube channel has been rather dormant for a while. it has been recently cleaned up, and new weekly segments will start appearing soon: friday in the studio – a peek into what i happen to be working on that day. episodes 1-3 are up now. composer tutorials – addressing questions about process and workflow. word of the week – helping to improve vocabularies everywhere. subscribe now, here. thank...

facelift

          in anticipation of a sleek new website design, this current version has been optimized and consolidated. the music, visuals, and about pages are easier to find and interact with. stay tuned for a new site, coming by year’s end. thanks for...

welcome

I’m very excited to reveal the newly renovated Blue Police Box Music website! It’s now incredibly easy for you to: Browse music, by genre, on the Music page, check out some clips (including my full-length composer reel) on the Visuals page, read as much as you care to about me, everywhere else, and get in touch with me directly. Huge thank you’s go out to RayRay at RayRayArt.com for the redesign. Getting this all set up was a wonderful process, and I highly recommend her if you’re looking for a web designer. Please feel free to look around, and if anything doesn’t work properly, please let me know so we can tweak it. As always, thanks for...

5 social media “dos” for young film composers

  Following up from my post, yesterday (The 5 “Don’ts”), I generally like to end on a positive note. Today – having listed what I feel are the most common and egregious online errors that young film composers make – I’d like to continue with some suggestions about how to foster active, positive, social media habits. Our situation will only improve if we stand up for ourselves, behave with unfailing professionalism, and never undervalue ourselves or our colleagues. We are not our competition. We are our professional network. Here we go… The 5 Social Media “Dos” for Young Film Composers   1. DO seek out new projects in interesting places. I often find paid work on terrific projects in unexpected online places. Ask yourself what your niche is, as a composer, and where filmmakers who share your interests might congregate. Rather than post broad and desperate calls for Attention To Be Paid (again, this simply does not work), instead, micro-target your offers to projects that you feel you’d be the best suited to tackle. Make direct contact with directors and producers. Send them short, to-the-point, gracious, bullshit-free, introductory emails, containing easy-to-click links to your Soundcloud page and your Demo Reel. If they want to see more picture, then follow up with a link to your YouTube page. Apart from your Demo Reel, don’t lead with images. Often, when someone hears a piece of music – together with picture they don’t like – it is tough for them to divorce the imagery from your music. Let the music speak for itself, and allow them to visualize your music in conjunction with the images in their head – or in their project –...

5 social media “don’ts” for young film composers

  I recently brought up some “Dos” and “Don’ts” for composers entering the film business to a professional development presentation for a class of grad students, and I thought I’d take a moment to share these with you. I see these mistakes being made all the time on forums, Facebook, Twitter, and everywhere else. If you want to be a professional, it’s best to start presenting yourself to the world as a professional. Anything less than that hurts all of us. So here we go: 5 Social Media “Don’ts” for Young Film Composers   1. DON’T make general offers of music on forums, message boards, or any other public site. This casts way too wide a net, makes you look desperate, and is a waste of time, since no-one really listens to these posted tracks with any degree of seriousness, anyway.   2. DON’T make general offers on any of your social media pages. It’s very easy to think that your social media pages are perfect advertising billboards, but it’s important for you to consider how you are advertising. Imitating a TV lawyer and going with the “Do you need a film composer? Then I’m your guy!” route is not the way to go.   3. DON’T beg. Too often, young composers are so hungry for work that they will run around the internet begging for random projects to hire them. This, again, makes you look desperate, and is also unprofessional.   4. DON’T enter contests. You are a professional. If anything, you should be helping judge contests. This is not ancient Rome. We are not on the floor of...