Introducing Captain Extraordinary!

I am thrilled to announce that I’ve been signed on as the composer for a new kids’ animated series, which is moving into development! Captain Extraordinary is being written by the inimitable Richard Dinnick – with whom I had the great pleasure of working on a Doctor Who audio adventure for Big Finish (You can check that out here!) – and is produced by Rushfirth Creative in the UK. Here is the original press release! The voice talent on board include Dan Starkey (Strax the Sontaran, Doctor Who), Matthew Lewis (Neville Longbottom, Harry Potter Series), and V.O. artist extraordinary Beth Chalmers. The original animatic trailer is in the works right now, and the score is already taking shape! We cannot wait to share this with you! It’s shaping up to be quite delightful. If you’d like to keep updated on the series, you can follow cast and crew on Twitter! Rushfirth Creative. Dan Starkey. Matt Lewis. Beth Chalmers. Richard Dinnick. & Me! [Insert witty “Extraordinary” phrase...

5 Social Media “Dos” for Young Film Composers

  Following up from my post, yesterday (The 5 “Don’ts”), I generally like to end on a positive note. Today – having listed what I feel are the most common and egregious online errors that young film composers make – I’d like to continue with some suggestions about how to foster active, positive, social media habits. Our situation will only improve if we stand up for ourselves, behave with unfailing professionalism, and never undervalue ourselves or our colleagues. We are not our competition. We are our professional network. Here we go… The 5 Social Media “Dos” for Young Film Composers   1. DO seek out new projects in interesting places. I often find paid work on terrific projects in unexpected online places. Ask yourself what your niche is, as a composer, and where filmmakers who share your interests might congregate. Rather than post broad and desperate calls for Attention To Be Paid (again, this simply does not work), instead, micro-target your offers to projects that you feel you’d be the best suited to tackle. Make direct contact with directors and producers. Send them short, to-the-point, gracious, bullshit-free, introductory emails, containing easy-to-click links to your Soundcloud page and your Demo Reel. If they want to see more picture, then follow up with a link to your YouTube page. Apart from your Demo Reel, don’t lead with images. Often, when someone hears a piece of music – together with picture they don’t like – it is tough for them to divorce the imagery from your music. Let the music speak for itself, and allow them to visualize your music in conjunction with the images in their head – or in their project –...

5 Social Media “Don’ts” for Young Film Composers

  I recently brought up some “Dos” and “Don’ts” for composers entering the film business to a professional development presentation for a class of grad students, and I thought I’d take a moment to share these with you. I see these mistakes being made all the time on forums, Facebook, Twitter, and everywhere else. If you want to be a professional, it’s best to start presenting yourself to the world as a professional. Anything less than that hurts all of us. So here we go: 5 Social Media “Don’ts” for Young Film Composers   1. DON’T make general offers of music on forums, message boards, or any other public site. This casts way too wide a net, makes you look desperate, and is a waste of time, since no-one really listens to these posted tracks with any degree of seriousness, anyway.   2. DON’T make general offers on any of your social media pages. It’s very easy to think that your social media pages are perfect advertising billboards, but it’s important for you to consider how you are advertising. Imitating a TV lawyer and going with the “Do you need a film composer? Then I’m your guy!” route is not the way to go.   3. DON’T beg. Too often, young composers are so hungry for work that they will run around the internet begging for random projects to hire them. This, again, makes you look desperate, and is also unprofessional.   4. DON’T enter contests. You are a professional. If anything, you should be helping judge contests. This is not ancient Rome. We are not on the floor of...

The Newest of News!

It’s been a very busy few weeks here at Blue Police Box Music, and there will be a lot of opportunities to see what I’ve been up to coming up in May! Scary Normal, our little feature that could, is screening – in competition – at the Golden Egg Film Festival in Cancun, Mexico, April 30th – May 7th. We are in the running for Best Feature, Best Feature Director (Jennifer Bechtel), and Best Actress (April Cleveland). It’s an honor to be nominated, of course! I’ll be on an industry panel, entitled “Rockin’ Music, Rollin’ Film: Creative Collaborations of Musicians and Filmmakers” as part of CIMMFest 2014. This Sunday – May the 4th (be with you) – at 2:00pm. Collaboraction in Wicker Park. I’m thrilled to be on a panel with John McNaughton, Wendy Jo Carlton, and some other serious pros. Hope to see you there! Our two recently wrapped short film projects – Bowes Academy and Safe Word – will be coming to film festivals this summer! Stay tuned! I’m currently working on the brilliant short film, “Get The F K Out Of Paris” – which will knock your socks off – and getting ready to hit the ground running on TV, film, and dance projects this summer! Thanks, as always, for listening and spreading the word! -d.  ...

Dharma Project: Revisiting the Roman Forum

I just had the pleasure of working with Director William Donaruma and Cinematographer John Klein (Fate Accompli) on this beautiful short for the DHARMA Project. DHARMA is a student-led team from the University of Notre Dame, that has been documenting international heritage sites with a 3-D laser scanner, giving us the most accurate depictions of them, possible. This film deals with their work on the Roman Forum. I was thrilled to work with this team, and I’ll be sharing more of our collaborations in the future! Enjoy! Revisiting the Roman Forum: From Pen to Pixel from William Donaruma on...